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Category: Food Service

With the holidays coming up and schools being closed, here are a few tips to help you enjoy your holiday break without worrying about product loss: • Make sure all of your refrigerated cabinet doors are closed properly • If there is excessive moisture building up in your cooler, it may mean that the door is not closing properly and/or the gasket needs to be replaced • Clean condenser filters • If you hear the condenser running more often and for longer than usual, have It checked out, as this could be a warning of equipment failure • Inspect evaporator coils for any damage and make sure they are clean • Make sure you keep the area around your evaporators and condensing units clear to ensure proper air flow • Make sure temperature is where it should be. Fluctuations in temperature can be an indicator that something is not working properly • Make sure the lights are off when exiting any walk-ins. Lights produce heat which will cause your unit to run more, in order to hold the optimal temperature. • When turning off power, make sure you are not shutting the power to the coolers/freezers • If you have a temperature monitoring system, make sure that the proper people are set up to receive alerts, in case a temperature goes out of range • Have a backup plan of where to store food, if you notice a cooler or freezer starting to fail
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Category: Food Service

General Mills recalled 10 million pounds of flour due to an E. Coli outbreak that the CDC confirmed was linked to General Mills flour. So far there have been 38 people in 20 states that have been confirmed infected as part of this E. Coli outbreak. If you have any of the recalled flour, make sure to discard it. There are a few things that you can do to make sure that you avoid getting E. Coli. First thing is to NEVER eat raw cookie dough or cake batter. Also, make sure to clean up your prep area to avoid any cross contamination of ingredients, including flour and eggs. Make sure that you bake or cook your foods to at least 160 °F, to kill any potential E. Coli. Get a temperature monitoring system, or use a regular food probe, to ensure that you are cooking your foods to at least 160° F.
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Tags : Food Safety

With cloud storage becoming the main source of data backup, it is vital that your temperature monitoring data also be stored in the cloud. Imagine if your server crashes. Do you have a backup of all of your temperature monitoring data, in case of a food safety inspection/audit? Also, how many IT hours are required to maintain and update your server? Do you have a disaster recovery procedure in place? Unfortunately, many people don’t think about these things until a disaster actually occurs.
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Category: Food Service

When monitoring the temperatures of equipment and food products in your operation, time is an important factor in ensuring food safety. The FDA specifies how long food is considered to be in the “safe zone.” You should have a HACCP plan in place that will help you avoid costly product loss by making sure that you have enough time to move your food, should any of your equipment start failing.
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Did you experience a failed cabinet and lose expensive inventory over the holidays? Was your staff forced to make daily trips to various locations, so they could manually record the temperatures of your cabinets? These are things that you don’t have to worry about if you have a proper wireless temperature monitoring system. When looking at various temperature monitoring systems, here are a few points that you should consider:
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Category: Food Service

With Thanksgiving Coming up, make sure to follow the suggestions below to have a safe and enjoyable holiday. When buying a turkey, it’s important to differentiate between a fresh turkey and a frozen turkey. If you plan on serving a fresh turkey, make sure you purchase it no more than two days before Thanksgiving. It’s a good idea to purchase two thermometers. One to check the cooler temperature to make sure that you are storing your turkey at 40 °F or a little below, and a second thermometer to make sure that the turkey is cooked to the safe range of 165 °F.
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Tags : Food Safety

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Category: Food Service

Your Foodservice operation should get recognition for quality of food and service, and not for lack of food safety and cleanliness. While this is an obvious statement and everyone strives to achieve quality and safety, there are certain tools that can make sure that you achieve your goals. A few tools that you should have and implement include: • A temperature monitoring system that allows you to view your entire operation • Knowledge of the different risk violations that could result in the closure of your food facility. • Monitoring your food temperatures on a regular basis, to make sure that all food is maintained at the proper approved temperatures. • Make sure you are following the right steps in washing your hands before handling food. • Make sure to establish a cleaning program/schedule for your facility.
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Tags : Food Safety

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Category: Food Service

With so many farmer’s markets all across the country giving consumers access to locally-grown fresh fruit, vegetables, and other grocery products, it is important to make sure you know a few things, to make sure that the food you purchase is safe.
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Category: Food Service

With FDA regulations becoming more strict, it’s vital that school food service departments have a reliable temperature monitoring system. The question becomes what to look for when choosing the perfect temperature monitoring system? Obviously, a good temperature monitoring system will automatically take temperature readings and alert you when any of your temperatures go out of range. The system should be user configurable, meaning that the end user can set their own parameters, based on their needs/HACCP plans. These parameters include how often the temperatures are taken, warning threshold temperatures, critical threshold temperatures, and which users should receive which alerts.
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Category: Healthcare Life Sciences

The FDA signed the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) into law on November 27, 2013.The purpose of this law is to establish a “track and trace” system to protect the U.S. drug supply against counterfeiting and other practices that would pose a threat to the safety of patients.Critical steps are outlined in the DSCSA to build an electronic, “interoperable” system by November 27, 2023 and improve detection and removal of potentially harmful products from the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain. Under the DSCSA, every drug coming in and out of any entity in the supply chain (from the original manufacturer to the end distributor), will need to be tracked, so that in the event of a problem, it’s path can be traced.
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